Tag Archives: social justice

Continue Engaging: Reflections from Listen to the Silence 2013

by Van Anh Tran, ‘13 + Healy Ko, ‘13

On February 2, 2013,  Stanford’s Asian American Students’ Association (AASA) held its 17th annual Listen to the Silence (LTS) conference, an Asian American issues conference that aims to empower students and community members to take action towards achieving social change. This year’s theme, “Click, Connect, Engage: From Social Media to Social Justice,” focused on the rise of social media as a force for achieving change within our communities.

This year’s conference was the largest Listen to the Silence in Stanford history with over 600 registrants, 22 workshops, 2 keynote speakers, and a high-profile Asian American artist. Through the workshops, LTS provided a space for students to learn about important issues affecting their community — from Asian American feminism to ethnic biases in public radio. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Equality is not Justice

by members of Stanford Students for Queer Liberation (SSQL)

We are the group of students responsible for the “equality is not justice” flyers last week. Because we are interested in both raising awareness and increasing understanding, we collaborated on a brief summary of each topic listed on the posters.

This article is meant to be shared! However, it is not meant to be the last word on any of the topics below: our foremost goal is to encourage discussion within the Stanford community.

Interested in continuing the conversation? Please consider submitting your ideas to STATIC!

Fear is not governance
Here, we are referring to the illusion that control is gained through fear or fear tactics and, furthermore, that legitimate government rule can be claimed when the majority of the population lives in a state of fear. Moreover, we are addressing the fact that fear is a tactic utilized by the United States, whether conscious or unconscious. Consider, for example, the reaction you have when you see a police officer. Are you afraid or comforted? Why? Also consider jails, which – though they seem to promise safety – are also an implicit threat by the state.

Apathy is not neutral
When we say that apathy is not neutral, we mean that – in many cases – apathy is a privilege. When we choose not to educate ourselves or to do nothing, it is with the knowledge that our lives will not be adversely affected – and not everybody is in such a position.
Another implication of apathy is the fact that, when there is apathy on the part of the state, entire groups of people may suffer. When legislators pay less attention to the well-being of groups such as trans* people of color, for example, this does not represent a simple oversight: it reflects a lack of commitment to the survival of a group that is consistently persecuted in this country.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Harry Potter: Social Justice Theory Absorbed by a Generation

by Sarah Quartey, ’14    

“It is important to fight, and fight again, and keep fighting, for only then can evil be kept at bay, though never quite eradicated.”
(Dumbledore, Half-Blood Prince 644-45) 

When and how did a generation of students eagerly absorbing the Harry Potter phenomenon become a force to be reckoned with?  The answer lies in in social justice education leadership theory.  In short, Albus Dumbledore, the headmaster of the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, and others like him, cultivated an independent and powerful youth community.  As a father figure, leader, and educator for young Harry Potter, Dumbledore became the mentor of an entire youth movement in J.K. Rowling’s universe.  But more than that, Dumbledore served as a role model for millions of children in the real world, who make up the Millennials (Palfrey 3), the generation born between the very late 1980s through 2005, during the rapid-pace change of the internet and digital culture.  Dumbledore’s influence on the Millennial generation is becoming clear as youth movements like Gay-Straight Alliances storm plazas and demand justice.  Dumbledore is an exemplar of social justice leadership by demonstrating extraordinary feats in each of the four tenets of the theory; his example should be followed in training educators and leaders of the future.  Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,