Tag Archives: Marxism

Marxism, Feminism and Women’s Liberation: A Discussion with Deepa Kumar

by Emma Wilde Botta, ’14

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Stanford has a lot of events about women. Conferences on women’s empowerment, discrimination in the workplace, women in research, increasing women’s participation in politics, the list goes on. All these events address ways in which women are marginalized in society.

However, missing from these discussions is a careful examination of the root cause of women’s oppression today.

Are men just naturally superior to women? Will equality before the law guarantee the liberation of all women within society? Will more women in leadership lead to women’s liberation?

Before we answer these questions, we must first identity the root cause of women’s oppression and then turn to strategies for women’s liberation. Continue reading

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The Earth is Not a Commodity: How Capitalism Perpetuates Global Warming

by Jovel Queirolo, ’14

Capitalism is designed to promote competition and social inequality (Parjis, 1995) which cannot accommodate a climate change movement meant to benefit the entire earth and its inhabitants with an even distribution. As an international leader, the United States government along with its citizens must shift from a mindset of social and economic capitalism toward a political framework that encourages collective equality. In the U.S., capitalism privileges wealthy, upper-class, white individuals who hold positions of power (Keister and Moller, 2000) over the rest of the country’s diverse constituency. This constituency must be invited into the climate change movement, and granted equal access to technology and research geared towards addressing dangerous levels of human-induced climate change.

Capitalism as an economic and social theory, as popularized by the United Sates, will not work as a tool for organizing the climate change movement because the environment is not a commodity, nor is the environment a human construct. Continue reading

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Blasting the Canon: On the Need for Inclusive Syllabi

by Jovel Queirolo, ’14

As an overeager high school senior, I unknowingly submitted myself to four years of stereotypes and no years of the dreaded IHUM – I decided to do SLE. Structured Liberal Education (SLE) is a Stanford program that offers first year students the opportunity to learn about history, literature, philosophy, and art without having to leave their dorm. At this time last year, our SLE cohort excitedly began the treacherous journey into modernity. I expected that the spring quarter readings would really resonate with us Millenials, but I found myself disappointed. For my final paper, I decided to review my intellectual experience in SLE in an effort to understand the dissonance I was feeling between my life and those we studied. I analyzed our “great books” syllabus and found that 6 out of 60 authors and thinkers were women, and predominantly white, upper class men filled the other 90% of the curriculum. With the ratio of female and male students and section leaders at about 1:1, I began to wonder what it means to receive a liberal education that so blatantly excludes other identities in this postmodern era. Continue reading

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